Designs For Low-Cost Houses

What Are The Best Designs For Low-Cost Houses?

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    Historically speaking, the construction of affordable housing complexes did not begin until the middle of the 20th century. These large-scale projects were conceived of as a modernist and progressive solution to the problem of providing adequate and affordable living quarters to large groups of people.

    Although architects may have meant well when they favoured massive, towering concrete structures devoid of human scale when designing affordable housing, this trend often resulted in complexes that actively discouraged strong communities and felt unquestionably isolating.

    While our cities continue to be plagued by a lack of affordable housing options, we have seen a growing interest among architects in designing decidedly alternative solutions to the outmoded models of the modernist era. In today's world, the concept of affordable housing seeks to accomplish more than just the creation of liveable spaces.

    Instead, new models of affordable housing incorporate sustainable features that reduce the cost of construction maintenance, technologies that help residents become more self-sufficient and connect them to outside resources, and greater reverence for human scale and connection to the street. These advantageous features are something that we can only hope to see more of in the future.

    FAQs About Home Design

    A home with a simple and concise layout is the cheapest type of house to build. Ranch homes are typically single-story structures with attached garages. They're easy to find construction plans for and highly customizable, so you can find a home that fits your needs and budget.

    Prefabricated, container and monolithic dome homes are just some of the most affordable new homes. Keep in mind that you'll need to add additional costs for land purchase, a foundation, taxes, transportation, and permits. But, of course, you could always save and buy an existing fixer-upper home.

    Rates start at $50 and go as high as $130 per hour for a draftsperson to draw blueprints or a house plan. Plans for a three-bedroom house require at least 10 hours to complete and typically cost anywhere from $500 to $2,000.

    The first mortgaging option for home construction projects is a "progress draw" mortgage. It is where the homebuyer will be granted the funds from their lender in instalments throughout the various stages of the build until the project is completed or close to completion.

    Budget (Money), Size, and Quality are the three items that are top of mind during every first meeting with a prospective client.

    Black & White Twins By Casanova + Hernandez Architecten, Blaricum, Netherlands

    The Black and White Twins are representative of a notable effort to combine modern aesthetics with cost-effective solutions. The exterior of the building is covered in a dark skin that is pierced with windows and other openings and that wraps around the interior of the building, while the open-air areas are painted white. The building can be conceptually divided into two parts. The innovative design created by Casanova + Hernandez architects features 29 low-cost apartments that are contained within a compact building that preserves the human scale characteristic of low-density projects.

    Hannibal Road Gardens By Peter Barber Architects, Stepney, England

    Instead, the wooden garden fences that already existed in the surrounding apartment buildings served as inspiration for the design of the shingle-covered Hannibal Road Gardens. This was in contrast to the generic housing that was found in the surrounding area. The housing strip is comprised of a series of stepped and notched garden terraces that face south-east and provides a total of eight completely affordable units, four of which are designated as socially rented.

    The quality of life of the residents was taken into consideration when the units were designed. Each home features at least two sizable courtyards or roof terraces, and the layout's notched design creates a variety of amenity spaces as well as different perspectives.

    Dattner Architects And Grimshaw, The Bronx, New York City

    Grimshaw's stepped 222-unit affordable housing complex in the South Bronx achieves LEED Gold certification and exceeds the guidelines for environmental responsibility set forth by the NYSERDA Multifamily Performance Program and Enterprise Green Communities. The complex was redeveloped on a brownfield site that had been reclaimed.

    A display in the main lobby provides information on energy statistics, such as the outputs of the solar panels in real time, as part of an effort to promote sustainable and cost-effective living strategies. In the same time, a ground level courtyard that is 6,000 square feet and spirals upwards creates a promenade of social spaces. Additionally, there are 34,000 square feet of green roofs that offer active gardening, reduce the amount of stormwater runoff, and enhance the building's insulation.

    Fougeron Architecture, San Francisco

    Fougeron Architecture, which was tasked with designing Parkview Terrace, an affordable housing complex in a city with sky-high rents, eschewed archaic models that would have patronised the building's low-income, elderly residents with an image of warmth and cosiness that was insincere.

    A community room, a health club, a beauty salon, a therapy centre, and a social services centre are some of the amenities that are included in the 101-unit concrete and glass building that aims to engage residents with the larger urban context. In addition, the horizontal windows have a slight undulation to them, which results in an increase in floor space at no additional cost.

    Guerin Pedroza Architectes, Saints, France

    The outmoded high-rise housing complex that was creating an isolating atmosphere in the neighbourhood was demolished and replaced by Bondy as part of the urban renewal plan for the Parisian suburb Saints. The design that was created by Guerin and Pedroza was a response to the imperative to both de-densify the region and reintegrate social housing into the urban fabric.

    The structure, which is covered in timber and has a rustic appearance, was conceived of as a residence that would be subdivided into three forms in order to encourage interaction between residents and their immediate neighbours. Each apartment has its own private balcony, garden, or terrace, and the building itself incorporates sustainable design elements such as solar panels and rainwater collection systems to minimise operating expenses and maximise environmental impact.

    Designs For Low-Cost Houses

    Teeple Architects, Toronto

    The 60 Richmond Street project aims to be a model for affordable housing that goes beyond simply providing residents with an inexpensive place to live. The project was designed for residents who were employed in the restaurant and hospitality industry in Toronto.

    Not only does the urban infill project keep its low cost of maintenance by making use of reclaimed materials and energy-saving strategies, but it also includes a restaurant that is owned and operated by the residents of the building as well as a training kitchen on the ground floor.

    Additionally, on the terrace located on the sixth floor, fruits, vegetables, and herbs are grown in order to both help residents improve their professional skills and provide food for the on-site restaurant. When compared to the conventionally boring aesthetic of condo buildings, the dynamic cut-in facade provides a welcome contrast.

    Avenier Cornejo Architectes, Paris

    The dark steel perforated facade designed by Avenir Cornejo Architectes sets 13 Rue Legendre apart from the surrounding masonry buildings. This was done after the city of Paris purchased the former location of a music and dance school in order to construct ten units of affordable housing. The metal panels function as full-height shutters, allowing for the flexible management of sun and light, which contributes to the reduction of thermal bridges and helps to maintain low-energy requirements.

    Kanner Architects, Santa Monica, California

    The 26th Street Affordable Housing building, designed by Kanner Architects, is horizontally oriented and features extensive use of glazing in homage to the well-known modernist architectural tradition of Southern California. The apartment building with 44 units has dual-glazed and laminated windows installed along both of the street-facing sides.

    This helps to reduce noise from passing traffic. In addition, the living areas are laid out in a linear fashion in order to make cross-ventilation easier to achieve. Cross-ventilation is a form of passive natural cooling that does away with the requirement for energy-intensive rooftop air conditioning.

    Casanova Hernandez Architects, Beekbergen, Netherlands

    Through the use of a design that seeks to integrate the complex with a park that is located nearby, the Ginkgo project investigates the potential for providing reasonably priced housing to residents of a variety of income levels.

    Gingko is an affordable housing solution that takes a design-oriented approach, and it was created for families with low incomes and people over the age of 65: Leaves from a Ginkgo Biloba tree were printed on the glass facade, and their response to the changing light of day and season results in strikingly different effects, shadows, reflections, and silhouettes. These effects are created by the interaction between the leaves and the light.

    David Baker Architects, San Francisco

    Residents of the 32 affordable units at Fillmore Park, who earn between 70 and 100 percent of the area's median income, congregate around an open central courtyard in an effort to foster a stronger sense of community. Fillmore Park was designed with this goal in mind.

    As a result of the private terraces and extensive landscaping, the neighbourhood of Fillmore Park in San Francisco's Fillmore District feels more like a tranquil village than a housing complex. This neighbourhood is one of the most densely populated in the city.

    Earth One Vaulted House — Cal-Earth

    The Earth One Vaulted House is one of the most functional prototypes that follows the layout of typical housing units found in California. It was built on superadobe, a construction technique that was invented by architect and humanitarian Nader Khalili. This structure is resistant to earthquakes and other natural disasters despite having a wall thickness of only 15 centimetres, despite the fact that its construction involves packing earth into a tube-shaped cloth bag that is then reinforced using wire.

    Within its 2300 square feet of space, the home features nine vaults, which can be broken down into three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and two garages for cars. This structure is one of the most successful low-cost structures that has ever been built because it incorporates standard technology into a superadobe structure.

    Aranya Housing Project — B V Doshi

    These housing units in Indore were successful in developing a large community because they were built around a labyrinth of paved internal pathways and parks. As a result, they were able to accommodate approximately 60,000 people in 6500 dwellings within an area of 85 hectares. The land was originally a slum, but the architect B.V. Doshi subdivided it into six sectors, with the commercial district serving as the "central spine" that runs through the middle of the property.

    Homes with the lowest incomes are located in the middle of each zone, while homes with higher incomes are located on the zone's perimeter. Each home features its own private courtyard in addition to rooms that range in price from moderate to low and are constructed out of locally sourced materials like bricks and stones.

    Chenkal Choola Housing — Laurie Baker

    Chenkalchoola Housing in Trivandrum gets its name from the red brick known as "Chenkal" that was formerly obtained from this location, which was formerly known as Thycaud Hill. This location is home to more than forty homes that were constructed according to Gandhian principles by architect Laurie Baker.

    Baker was drawn to the natural colour and texture of the red bricks, so he refrained from plastering or painting them to preserve their aesthetic appeal. As a consequence of this, each house is distinguishable from the others, with the aspect that sets them apart being the bricked wall that surrounds them and the fact that they are grouped together around a common area that is adjacent to the main road.

    In spite of being a well-designed colony with homes constructed in accordance with residents' means, the area became a hotspot for criminal activity when government officials failed to provide adequate oversight and upkeep. This resulted in non-permissive sheds being built along the roadside.

    S-House — Vo Trong Nghia Architects

    This house is an example of low-cost construction and can be found in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. It was built with a budget of 4,000 US dollars and on an area that was only 30 square metres in size. The people who lived in low-cost, makeshift housing in the area gave the construction of a structure that was both lightweight and permanent the utmost importance as the primary goal of the project.

    As a result, the architect designed three different prototypes, of which the third one is currently being built. A steel-framed structure with nipa palm panels installed as walls makes up the first phase of the project. The second phase of the project involves do-it-yourself (DIY) and modular construction using a concrete framed structure with self-attachable panels to create a double wall that provides thermal comfort from the tropical climate.

    Designs For Low-Cost Houses

    Villa Verde — Alejandro Aravena

    An interesting proposal for "half a good house" was made by the architect Alejandro Aravena. According to this idea, rather than constructing a small house from start to finish, it would be more cost effective to build a large house that was only partially finished. Based on the philosophy of the architect John F. C. Turner, who stated that squatting and huge housing deficits would result if housing were not an ongoing process.

    After the devastating earthquake in Chile that destroyed more than eighty percent of the buildings in the city, the forestry company Arauco requested the assistance of the architect in order to produce a development plan for the purpose of housing their employees there. The houses, which all seemed to be the same, were arranged in such a way as to form a courtyard in the middle, which contributed to the development of a robust community.

    Empower Shack — Urban-Think Tank

    This housing system, which was designed during the time of post-apartheid South Africa for the people living in Cape Town, was able to help solve the housing crisis that was occuring as a result of the rising prices of property. The purpose of the project was to improve over 2700 unofficial settlements by distributing public land in an equitable manner, utilising cutting-edge methodologies, and providing standard conveniences.

    As a result of the buildings' smaller footprint compared to that of a typical slum with dense housing, the land is utilised in a more effective manner, and residents of the community are given long-term stake in the development. Workshops on alternative forms of income, such as renewable energy and water management training, are also provided for the community as an additional benefit of the scheme.

    Iha Residence — Vinu Daniel

    This serene home in the bustling city of Trivandrum in Kerala is a paradox in that it portrays serenity on the outside while concealing an exciting interior. The helical facade, which resembles a large hammock and features seating areas for the residents, serves as a channel that directs rainwater away from the house, thereby shielding it from the effects of rain.

    The water is directed towards the soil, where it is either harvested or recycled, using bamboo channels that are supported for stability by steel rods. Jali work not only saves money on the expensive process of installing windows but also adds visual appeal to the structure. In order to adhere to the principles of maintaining the natural colour and texture, as stated by Laurie Baker, the walls are constructed out of CSEB bricks, which stand for compressed stabilised earth blocks.

    Post–Tsunami Housing — Shigeru Ban

    For the Muslim fishing community in Tissamaharama in Sri Lanka, which had lost everything in the Tsunami that struck in 2004, the project proposed building 100 houses with a total floor space of 71 square metres. The tropical climate of Sri Lanka inspired Japanese architect Shigeru Ban to create a covered communal space in his building designs for the island nation.

    Each model of the house has a hallway, two bedrooms, and a covered courtyard that serves as the living room and dining area. The rooms are separated by wooden screens to accommodate the communal nature of Muslim households. Panels made of local rubber tree wood instal themselves as walls and partitions, and compressed earth serves as building material for walls. Coconut wood and teak, both of which are readily available in the area, are used in the construction of the pitched roof.

    Casa Convento — Enrique Mora Alvardo

    This house, which can be found along the coast of Ecuador and is surrounded by a picturesque landscape created by large bamboo trees, rainforests, and a small creek flowing through the plot, was constructed out of bamboo because it is readily available in the area and because it was built within the constraints of a budget of $1500. This structure stands out from others due to the fact that members of the same family worked on it together while learning a variety of construction methods.

    The structure includes a living room, three bedrooms, and a room for the service of the building. The service rooms feature a kitchen as well as bathrooms; these rooms are linked to the living area to create a communal space that opens up to the outside air and a hanging garden.

    La Maison Au Bord De L’eau — Charlotte Perriand

    Charlotte Perriand created the concept for the purpose of entering it in a competition; however, it was never actually built. It wasn't until 2014, when Julie de Libran, director of Louis Vuitton, constructed this in order to host a Design Miami exhibition, that it came to anyone's attention. Although the setting was Italy, the shipment that was sent to Miami was missing a significant number of the original's components.

    Over the course of more than ten years spent as a member of Le Corbusier's research team, Perriand conducted experiments with various structural theories. She implemented "the Modulo" in the structure's scaling as well as the furniture, which consisted of chairs made from tree trunks that were cut down to a minimal height. The house has two wings that connect to a semi-closed corridor that has an entrance from the backyard. Sliding doors are used to separate the different areas of the house.

    Conclusion

    The Black and White Twins are illustrative of a noteworthy effort to combine the aesthetic sensibilities of modernity with practical approaches to problems. The innovative design that was developed by Casanova + Hernandez architects includes 29 apartments that are available for rent at affordable prices. These apartments are housed within a compact building that maintains the human scale that is typical of low-density projects. The housing strip provides a total of eight completely affordable units and is made up of a series of garden terraces that are stepped and notched. These terraces face south-east and are arranged in a zigzag pattern. The 222-unit affordable housing complex in the South Bronx that was designed by Dattner Architects and Grimshaw has been awarded the LEED Gold certification. Each house has at least two substantial courtyards or roof terraces, and the design of the floor plan's notches creates a variety of amenity spaces as well as different perspectives.

    As part of an effort to promote sustainable living strategies, there is a display located in the main lobby that provides information on energy statistics. This display includes information on the outputs of the solar panels in real time. The Ginkgo project in the Netherlands is a solution for affordable housing that takes an approach focused on design. In homage to the well-known modernist architectural tradition of Southern California, the 26th Street Affordable Housing building, which was designed by Kanner Architects and constructed by Kanner Construction, features extensive use of glazing. The project at 60 Richmond Street aspires to be a model for affordable housing that goes beyond simply offering residents a cheap place to live. This goal is part of the project's larger vision. One of the most practical prototypes, the Earth One Vaulted House is designed in the same fashion as the majority of housing units that can be found in the state of California.

    Within an area of 85 hectares, the Aranya Housing Project in Indore, India was able to provide homes for approximately 60,000 residents who were housed in 6500 individual structures. Despite having a wall thickness of only 15 centimetres, this building is resistant to earthquakes and other natural disasters. Its construction involves packing earth into a tube-shaped cloth bag, which is then reinforced using wire. The red brick that was formerly obtained from this location, which was formerly known as Thycaud Hill, is where the neighbourhood of Chenkal Choola Housing in Trivandrum gets its name from. In addition to having its own private courtyard, each home also features rooms that range in price from moderate to low and are built out of materials like bricks and stones that are sourced from the surrounding area. The Mekong Delta in Vietnam is home to this house, which serves as an illustration of low-cost construction and can be found there.

    Following the devastating earthquake that occurred in Chile, the forestry company Arauco requested the services of an architect to create a development plan for the housing of their employees. People living in Cape Town were targeted during the time period following the end of apartheid in South Africa to receive this housing solution. The mission of the project was to revitalise over 2700 squatter communities by redistributing publicly owned land in a fair and equitable manner and making use of innovative research and development techniques. Japanese architect Shigeru Ban's building designs for the island nation of Sri Lanka included a covered communal space. This was because of the tropical climate of Sri Lanka, which inspired Ban. Every layout of the house consists of a corridor, two bedrooms, and a covered courtyard that doubles as both the living room and the dining area.

    Walls and partitions are self-installing panels made of local rubber tree wood, and compressed earth is used as a building material for walls. The Charlotte Perriand house known as La Maison Au Bord De L'eau was never constructed in its entirety and was instead transported to Miami for the Design Miami exhibition. The project was carried out collaboratively by members of the same family, who did so while gaining experience in a variety of building techniques. The house has two wings that connect to a semi-closed corridor that has an entrance from the backyard. There is also an exit from the corridor into the backyard.

    Content Summary

    1. From a historical perspective, the beginning of the construction of housing complexes that were priced affordably did not occur until the middle of the 20th century.
    2. These expansive projects were conceived of as a modernist and progressive solution to the problem of providing adequate and affordable living quarters to large groups of people. Their intended purpose was to house a large number of individuals.
    3. Although architects may have had good intentions when they favoured massive, towering concrete structures devoid of human scale when designing affordable housing, this trend frequently resulted in complexes that actively discouraged strong communities and felt unquestionably isolating. Although architects may have had good intentions, this trend often resulted in complexes that actively discouraged strong communities and felt unquestionably isolating.
    4. While our cities continue to be plagued by a lack of affordable housing options, we have seen a growing interest among architects in designing decidedly alternative solutions to the outmoded models of the modernist era. This is despite the fact that our cities continue to be plagued by a lack of affordable housing options.
    5. The goal of the concept of affordable housing in the modern world is to realise a number of other goals in addition to the production of liveable spaces.
    6. Instead, new models of affordable housing incorporate sustainable features that reduce the cost of construction maintenance, technologies that help residents become more self-sufficient and connect them to outside resources, and a greater reverence for human scale and connection to the street. All of these elements work together to make housing more affordable.
    7. These are the kinds of beneficial characteristics that we can only look forwards to seeing more of in the years to come.
    8. The open-air areas of the building are painted white, while the exterior of the building is covered in a dark skin that is pierced with windows and other openings and that wraps around the interior of the building.
    9. The structure can be conceptually broken up into two distinct sections.
    10. The innovative design that was developed by Casanova + Hernandez architects includes 29 apartments that are available for rent at affordable prices. These apartments are housed within a compact building that maintains the human scale that is typical of low-density projects.
    11. Hannibal Road Gardens Stepney, England's Peter Barber Architects were responsible for this. Instead, the design of the shingle-covered Hannibal Road Gardens was conceptualised with the help of the wooden garden fences that were already present in the apartment buildings that surrounded the location.
    12. This stood in stark contrast to the cookie-cutter homes that were scattered throughout the neighbourhood.
    13. The housing strip is made up of a series of garden terraces that are stepped and notched and face south-east. It offers a total of eight completely affordable units, four of which are classified as socially rented housing.
    14. When planning the layout of the apartments, the designers made sure to take into account how the residents' lives would be affected by their decisions.
    15. Each house has at least two substantial courtyards or roof terraces, and the design of the floor plan's notches creates a variety of amenity spaces as well as different perspectives.
    16. Dattner Architects and Grimshaw, located in the Bronx in the city of New York
    17. Grimshaw's stepped 222-unit affordable housing complex in the South Bronx has achieved LEED Gold certification and exceeds the guidelines for environmental responsibility set forth by the NYSERDA Multifamily Performance Program and Enterprise Green Communities. The complex is located in the South Bronx.
    18. The complex was rebuilt on an abandoned brownfield that was later cleaned up and turned into a park.
    19. As part of an effort to promote sustainable and cost-effective living strategies, there is a display in the main lobby that provides information on energy statistics. This display, which can be found in the main lobby, provides information such as the outputs of the solar panels in real time.
    20. Concurrently, a ground-level courtyard that is approximately 6,000 square feet in size and spirals upwards creates a promenade of social spaces.
    21. In addition, there are green roofs totalling 34,000 square feet that provide space for active gardening, lessen the amount of stormwater runoff, and improve the insulation of the building.
    22. Fougeron Architecture, which was tasked with designing Parkview Terrace, an affordable housing complex in a city with sky-high rents, avoided using antiquated models that would have patronised the building's low-income and elderly residents with an image of warmth and cosiness that was insincere. These models would have presented an impression of warmth and cosiness that the residents would have perceived as insincere.
    23. In the 101-unit concrete and glass building that aims to engage residents with the larger urban context, some of the amenities that are included are a community room, a health club, a beauty salon, a therapy centre, and a social services centre. Additionally, the building also includes a social services centre.
    24. The horizontal windows also have a slight undulation to them, which results in an increase in floor space without any additional cost being incurred.
    25. As part of the urban renewal project for the Parisian suburb Saints, the antiquated high-rise housing complex that was the source of an isolating atmosphere in the neighbourhood was torn down and replaced by Bondy. This action was taken as part of the plan.
    26. Guerin and Pedroza's design was a response to the imperative to both de-densify the region and reintegrate social housing into the urban fabric. This was accomplished through the use of a design that was created by Guerin and Pedroza.
    27. The building, which is clad in timber and has a weathered appearance, was originally conceived of as a residence that would be subdivided into three forms in order to encourage interaction between residents and their immediate neighbours. It now has a rustic appearance and is covered in timber.
    28. The project at 60 Richmond Street aspires to be a model for affordable housing that goes beyond simply offering residents a cheap place to live. This goal is part of the project's larger vision.
    29. Residents of Toronto who worked in the catering, hotel, or restaurant business were the target audience for this particular project.
    30. Not only does the urban infill project keep its low cost of maintenance by making use of reclaimed materials and energy-saving strategies, but it also includes a restaurant that is owned and operated by the residents of the building, in addition to a training kitchen that is located on the ground floor of the building. Both of these features are included in the urban infill project.
    31. In addition, on the terrace that is located on the sixth floor, fruits, vegetables, and herbs are grown in order to provide food for the on-site restaurant as well as help residents improve their professional skills.
    32. The dynamic cut-in facade offers a welcome contrast to the typical dull aesthetic of condominium buildings. This comparison can be made by looking at the two styles side by side.
    33. 13 Rue Legendre stands out from the other masonry buildings in the neighbourhood thanks to the dark steel and perforated facade that was designed by Avenir Cornejo Architectes.
    34. This was carried out after the city of Paris purchased the land that formerly housed a music and dance school with the intention of developing ten units of low-cost housing on the property.
    35. The metal panels serve as full-height shutters, allowing for the flexible management of sun and light. This flexible management of sun and light contributes to the reduction of thermal bridges, which helps to maintain low-energy requirements.
    36. In a nod to the well-known modernist architectural tradition of Southern California, the 26th Street Affordable Housing building, which was designed by Kanner Architects and constructed by Kanner Construction, has a horizontal orientation and makes extensive use of glazing.
    37. Along both of the street-facing sides of the apartment building that contains 44 individual units, there are windows that are laminated and have dual glazing installed.
    38. This helps to lessen the amount of noise produced by passing vehicles.
    39. In addition, the living areas have been designed with a linear layout in order to make it simpler to achieve adequate levels of cross-ventilation.
    40. It is possible to eliminate the need for costly and energy-intensive rooftop air conditioning by utilising a passive form of natural cooling known as cross-ventilation.
    41. The Ginkgo project investigates the possibility of providing housing at prices that are affordable to people with a wide range of incomes. This is accomplished through the utilisation of a design that seeks to integrate the complex with a park that is situated in close proximity to the complex.
    42. Gingko is an affordable housing solution that takes an approach focused on design. It was developed for families with low incomes and individuals over the age of 65:
    43. The leaves of a Ginkgo Biloba tree were printed on the glass facade, and the way in which these leaves react to the shifting light of the day and the seasons results in strikingly different effects, shadows, reflections, and silhouettes.
    44. These effects are brought about as a result of the interaction between the light and the leaves.
    45. Residents of Fillmore Park's 32 affordable units, whose incomes range from 70 to 100 percent of the area's median income, congregate around an open central courtyard in an effort to foster a stronger sense of community. These residents earn between 70 and 100 percent of the area's median income.
    46. This was a primary consideration during the planning and design of Fillmore Park.
    47. The neighbourhood of Fillmore Park in San Francisco's Fillmore District has the atmosphere of a peaceful village rather than that of a housing complex. This is due in large part to the private terraces and extensive landscaping that can be found there.
    48. This neighbourhood is consistently ranked as one of the most populous in the entire city.
    49. One of the most practical prototypes, the Earth One Vaulted House is designed in the same fashion as the majority of housing units that can be found in the state of California.
    50. It was constructed using a method known as superadobe, which was developed by Nader Khalili, an architect who is also active in the humanitarian sector.
    51. This building is resistant to earthquakes and other natural disasters despite having a wall thickness of only 15 centimetres, despite the fact that its construction involves packing earth into a tube-shaped cloth bag that is then reinforced using wire, and despite the fact that its construction involves packing earth into a tube-shaped cloth bag that is then reinforced using wire.
    52. The home has a total area of 2300 square feet, and within that space there are nine vaults that can be partitioned into three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and two garages for cars respectively.
    53. Because it incorporates standard technology into a superadobe structure, this building is one of the most successful low-cost structures that has ever been built. It ranks among the most successful structures overall.
    54. The fact that these housing units in Indore were constructed around a complex network of paved internal pathways and parks contributed to the city's achievement of its goal of creating a sizable community.
    55. As a direct consequence of this, they were able to house approximately 60,000 people across 6,500 dwellings while occupying only 85 hectares of land.
    56. The land had been used as a slum in the past, but the architect B.V. Doshi partitioned it off into six distinct areas. The commercial district now serves as the "central spine" of the property, which is located in the middle of the land.
    57. The areas of each zone that contain the homes with the lowest incomes can be found in the zones' middles, while the areas that contain the higher income homes can be found on the zones' edges.
    58. In addition to having its own private courtyard, each home also features rooms that range in price from moderate to low and are built out of materials like bricks and stones that are sourced from the surrounding area.
    59. Chenkalchoola Housing in Trivandrum got its name from the red brick known as "Chenkal" that was formerly obtained from this location, which was formerly known as Thycaud Hill. Chenkalchoola Housing is located in what was formerly known as Thycaud Hill.
    60. More than forty houses were built at this location by architect Laurie Baker in accordance with Gandhian ideals, and they can be found here.
    61. Baker was captivated by the natural colour and texture of the red bricks, and as a result, he decided against plastering or painting them in order to maintain the aesthetic appeal of the bricks themselves.
    62. Because of this, each home is easily distinguished from the others. The bricked wall that encircles each home as well as the fact that they are clustered together around a shared space that is located close to the primary thoroughfare are the two characteristics that serve as the primary differentiators between the homes.
    63. In spite of the fact that it was a well-designed colony with homes built in accordance with the means of the residents, the area became a hotspot for criminal activity as a result of the failure of government officials to provide adequate oversight and upkeep.
    64. As a direct consequence of this, non-permissive sheds were constructed along the roadside.
    65. The Mekong Delta in Vietnam is home to this house, which serves as an illustration of low-cost construction and can be found there.
    66. It was constructed with a budget of 4,000 United States dollars and was constructed on a space that was only 30 square metres in size.
    67. People who lived in makeshift, low-cost housing in the area gave the construction of a structure that was both lightweight and permanent the utmost importance as the primary goal of the project. This gave the construction of a structure that was both lightweight and permanent the utmost importance.
    68. As a direct consequence of this, the architect came up with three distinct prototypes, of which the third is currently in the process of being constructed.
    69. The initial stage of the construction project consists of the construction of a steel-framed structure with nipa palm panels installed as walls.
    70. Do-it-yourself (DIY) and modular construction using a concrete framed structure with self-attachable panels to create a double wall that provides thermal comfort from the tropical climate is the focus of the second phase of the project.
    71. Villa Verde — Alejandro Aravena Alejandro Aravena, an architect, came up with an intriguing proposition for what he called "half a good house."
    72. According to the logic behind this proposition, it would be more cost effective to build a large house that was only partially finished than it would be to construct a smaller house from scratch and bring it up to its present state of completion.
    73. Based on the philosophy of the architect John F. C. Turner, who stated that huge housing deficits and squatting would result if housing were not an ongoing process. He also stated that squatting would be a result.
    74. Following the devastating earthquake that struck Chile in 2010, which caused the destruction of more than eighty percent of the buildings in the city, the forestry company Arauco asked for the assistance of the architect in order to produce a development plan for the purpose of housing their employees there.
    75. The houses, which were all seemingly identical, were arranged in such a way as to form a courtyard in the middle, which contributed to the development of a strong community. This was one of the factors that contributed to the success of the community.
    76. This housing system, which was designed during the time of post-apartheid South Africa for the people living in Cape Town, was able to help solve the housing crisis that was occuring as a result of the rising prices of property. It was able to do this because it was developed during the time in South Africa after apartheid ended.
    77. The objective of the project was to enhance the quality of life in over 2700 unofficial settlements through the equitable distribution of public land, the application of cutting-edge methodologies, and the provision of basic conveniences.
    78. Residents of the community are given a long-term stake in the development because the buildings have a smaller footprint than those found in a typical slum with dense housing. This allows the land to be utilised in a more effective manner, and it also provides residents of the community with a stake in the development.
    79. In addition, as an additional service to the community, the plan will facilitate the delivery of training sessions on alternative means of financial support, such as workshops on sustainable energy and water management.
    80. This serene home in the bustling city of Trivandrum in Kerala is a paradox in that it portrays serenity on the outside while concealing an exciting interior. Although it is located in the state of Kerala, it is located in the country of India.
    81. The helical facade, which is designed to look like a large hammock and includes seating areas for the inhabitants, also functions as a channel that directs rainwater away from the house, which protects the home from the damaging effects of rain.
    82. By utilising bamboo channels that are supported for stability by steel rods, the water is guided towards the soil, where it is either harvested or recycled.
    83. Jali work not only helps save money on the costly process of installing windows, but it also contributes to the structure's overall aesthetic appeal.
    84. The walls are built out of CSEB bricks, which stands for compressed stabilised earth blocks. This was done so that the walls would adhere to the principles of maintaining the natural colour and texture, as stated by Laurie Baker.
    85. The project proposed constructing one hundred homes in Tissamaharama, which is located in Sri Lanka, with a total floor space of seventy-one square metres for a Muslim fishing community that had been completely wiped out by the tsunami that occurred in 2004.
    86. Japanese architect Shigeru Ban's building designs for the island nation of Sri Lanka included a covered communal space. This was because of the tropical climate of Sri Lanka, which inspired Ban.
    87. Every layout of the house consists of a corridor, two bedrooms, and a covered courtyard that doubles as both the living room and the dining area.
    88. In order to accommodate the communal nature of Muslim households, the rooms are separated from one another by wooden screens.
    89. Walls and partitions are self-installing panels made of local rubber tree wood, and compressed earth is used as a building material for walls.
    90. The pitched roof that is being constructed is made out of teak and coconut wood because both of these materials can be found in abundance in the region.
    91. This house, which can be found along the coast of Ecuador and is surrounded by a picturesque landscape created by large bamboo trees, rainforests, and a small creek flowing through the plot, was built out of bamboo because it is readily available in the area and because it was built within the constraints of a budget of $1500. In addition, the house is situated in a picturesque setting that was created by large bamboo trees, rainforests, and a small creek flowing through the plot.
    92. This building stands out from others because it was built by members of the same family, who collaborated on it while simultaneously gaining experience in a variety of building techniques.
    93. The building features a living room, three bedrooms, and a room that is used for building maintenance and other building-related functions.
    94. These rooms are connected to the living area to create a communal space that opens up to the fresh air and a hanging garden. The service rooms include a kitchen in addition to bathrooms.
    95. Charlotte Perriand conceived of the idea with the intention of entering it in a contest; however, the idea was never brought to fruition in the form of a physical structure.
    96. It wasn't until 2014 that this came to anyone's attention because Julie de Libran, director of Louis Vuitton, constructed it in order to host a Design Miami exhibition. At that time, it was the only reason anyone knew about it.
    97. Despite the fact that it was taking place in Italy, the shipment that was sent to Miami was missing a significant number of the components that were included in the original.
    98. Perriand worked for Le Corbusier's research team for more than ten years, during which time he experimented with a variety of different structural theories.
    99. She utilised "the Modulo" in the scaling of the structure, as well as in the furniture, which was comprised of chairs made from tree trunks that had their height reduced to a minimum.
    100. The house has two wings that connect to a semi-closed corridor that has an entrance from the backyard. There is also an exit from the corridor into the backyard.
    101. Sliding doors serve as the primary means by which the various sections of the house are partitioned off from one another.
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